1

Look at these examples below:

"Let me come in", He said.

If we change it in the indirect speech which of the options is correct and why?

a) He requested that he might be allowed to come in.

b) He requested that I might be allowed to come in.

My doubt is what to choose as the subject (he/ I) for this type sentence?

Additionally, correct me if I am wrong in case of imperative sentence , when we receive word based on 'objective case' in direct speech we change that with that form only in indirect sentence, like

He said, " Let us go there "

He suggested that we should go there.

And if this rule is correct then it should be 'I' in the mentioned question. Isn't it?

  • He asked me/them/us/etc. to let him come in. Obviously given an "original" of just He said "Let me come in", we've no idea who he's asking, but if you were the person who actually wrote that original version, you'd know, and would be able to choose the appropriate pronoun. If you don't want that to be an issue, just go for a "passive" version, such as He asked to be let in (your first alternative is syntactically valid, but stilted / wordy). – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Jul 28 '18 at 16:42
  • in case of an imperative sentence, when we receive word based on 'objective case' in direct-speech we change that with that form only in an indirect sentence, like He said, " Let us go there " He suggested that we should go there. And if this rule is correct then it should be 'I' in the mentioned question. Isn't it? Is the rule I have mentioned is not correct? – Ritwik Bhattacharyya Jul 28 '18 at 21:13
  • I don't really understand what you mean, but I'm guessing you're talking about converting nominative pronouns (I, he, we, they,...) to accusative (me, him, us, them,...). Which applies in contexts such as converting "active" reported speech He said "John insulted us!" to "passive" He said [that] we were insulted by John. But I don't see how that relates to your main question. Bear in mind that He said, "Let us go there" could be a request (to someone in authority; "Please allow us to go") or a suggestion ("What should we do? I propose that we should go there"). – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Jul 29 '18 at 12:46
1

In the first part of the question, the only correct answer is "he."

'He said, "Let me in."' means that he requested to be let in. In direct speech, you are quoting the exact words used. In indirect speech, you are conveying the meaning of the words.

MAJOR EDIT BASED ON OP's COMMENT BELOW

"He said 'Let us in'" implies that whoevever he is, he is part of a collective, but, absent prior context, who is in that collective except for the speaker is unclear. To use "us" in indirect speech is even more ambiguous because the reporter is now clearly being included in the collective without indicating whether or not the speaker is included.

Pronouns are useful ony when it is clear what nouns they represent.

| improve this answer | |
  • Hey, what I wanted to ask is in case of an imperative sentence, when we receive word based on 'objective-case' in direct speech we change that with that form in indirect sentence, ex :He said, " Let us go there " He suggested that we should go there. And if this rule is correct ( which I have a doubt) then it should be 'I' in the mentioned question. Isn't it? – Ritwik Bhattacharyya Jul 28 '18 at 21:11
0

Pronouns are always used from the speaker's perspective, except when quoting directly. The direct quote in quotation marks uses the same pronouns that were actually spoken.

Bob requested that he (Bob) might be allowed to come in.
=He requested that he might be allowed to come in.
=He said, "Let me come in."

Bob suggested that he (Bob) and his friend (Charlie) go there.
=He suggested that they go there.
=He said, "Let us go there."

Bob suggested that he (Bob) and I (the speaker) go there.
=He suggested that we go there.
=He said, "Let us go there."

| improve this answer | |
0

Please, allow me to give you good reason for some of your doubts.

 

"Let me come in," he said to me.
 
He requested that I allow him to come in.

The subject of this imperative let is the implicit second person.  In this example, the active voice of the direct speech is retained in the indirect reference.  The change from implicit second-person to explicit first-person reflects nothing more than the change in which person speaks.  His words are spoken from his perspective, and mine from mine. 

 

"Let Ritwik come in," he said to them.
 
He requested that you be allowed to come in.

In this example, we see a change in voice between the original and the representation.  The direct object "Ritwik" in the active voice becomes the subject in the passive voice.  His original subject doesn't even appear in my report of his request. 

 

He said, "Let us go there."
 
He suggested that we go there.

The voice of his statement and my report are both active.  In this example, the thing that changes is which verb is primary.  The verb to let isn't represented at all -- not even by a synonym like to allow -- in the subordinate clause of this report.  Instead, we have a finite form of to go taking as its subject the object of let that is modified in his original by the bare infinitive phrase object complement. 

 

You seem to be confusing and conflating these three separate effects: change of person speaking, change in grammatical voice, and change to primary verb.  You won't find one rule that covers all three cases.  Instead, you need to determine which and how many of these separate effects happen to apply to any given sentence.

One rule doesn't handle them all.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.