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Do we need "at" before "around 7 AM" as in "I go to work (at) around 7 AM"?

We got these examples in this dictionary

around /əˈraʊnd/ adverb

We got home at around 8 o'clock. = (US) We got home around about 8 o'clock. [=it was approximately 8 o'clock when we got home]

We also got these examples in this dictionary

He arrived (at) about ten.

I don't understand why they use "around" & "about" together. So they use 2 adverbs "around" & "about", which have same meaning, next to each other

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Question:

Do we need “at” before “around 7AM” as in “I go to work (at) around 7 AM”?

Answer:

No

You could say:

I go to work at 7 AM
I go to work around 7 AM
I go to work at around 7 AM

"Around" means "approximately". However, you could not say "I go to work approximately 7 AM"

I don't understand why they use "around" & "about" together.

Those words both mean the same thing, and so are redundant. Specifically "around about" has a slow, relaxed, southern feel to it. "Round about 7pm"

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