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I want to write the following sentence using the more ... the fewer statement.

There are 50 soldiers and 5 missions to be carried out.

If N soldiers are assigned to the missions, then 50-N soldiers support the soldiers assigned to the missions in the rear.

My first question is: do I need the word is or are written out twice in these statements?

My second question is: do I need the definite article before the word number?

My third question is: do I need to use the word number at all?

That is,

  • the more the number of the soldiers assigned to the missions is, the fewer the number of the soldiers that can play a role as assistants in the rear is.
  • the more the number of the soldiers assigned to the missions, the fewer the number of the soldiers that can play a role as assistants in the rear.

  • the more number of the soldiers assigned to the missions is, the fewer number of the soldiers that can play a role as assistants in the rear is.
  • the more number of the soldiers assigned to the missions, the fewer number of the soldiers that can play a role as assistants in the rear.

  • the more the soldiers assigned to the missions are, the fewer the soldiers that can play a role as assistants in the rear are.
  • the more soldiers assigned to the missions, the fewer solders that can play a role as assistants in the rear.

Which one is the best? If there is other better sentences, please let me know.

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In a sentence like this one, I'd try to keep the wording concise. The more verbose the sentence, the harder it is to follow.

I think what you are trying to say would be better expressed using as, because you are analyzing the relationship between (N) and (50–N):

As more soldiers are assigned to the forward mission, fewer soldiers are available to assist in the rear.

  • Thank you, I will use what you recommend. (Just wondering, are the sentences listed above grammatically wrong, or uncomfortable to see? If they are acceptable, which is the best?) – Danny_Kim Jul 30 '18 at 9:37
  • I wouldn't call your originals "grammatically wrong," but I would say they are overly wordy and that makes them awkward and difficult to follow. – J.R. Jul 30 '18 at 10:34

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