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It would have been best written in a more concise way as it does tend to ramble.

I came across this sentence in Collins dictionary. I'm not sure what the sentence is trying to convey. The author uses the conjunction word as to connect the two clauses "It would have been best written in a more concise way" and "it does tend to ramble". But the two seem to be irrelevant. I am kind of lost here. Any thought?

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You could also write:

It would have been best written in a more concise way because it does tend to ramble.

would have been implies an expectation (written in a more concise way), which is followed by an opinion/reasoning why the expectation was not met (it tends to ramble).

You can't use if because the if/then format implies a more factual cause and effect. For example:

I won't buy the book if the topic discussed doesn't stay focused.

  • I see what you meant, but that connection is still odd to me. "It does tend to ramble" is the fact we get, it doesn't sound a good reason for writing it in a more concise way. It seems to make more sense to me if the sentence is written as "It would have been best written in a more concise way if it didn't tend to ramble". – dan Jul 31 '18 at 3:28
  • I edited my explanation. – user3169 Jul 31 '18 at 5:11
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    But, @Dan, if it didn't ramble, it would already be concise. – Gary Botnovcan Jul 31 '18 at 12:29

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