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"It’s been so long since we last were in touch but I haven’t forgotten all the wonderful times we spent together last year. It’s my birthday coming up and I wanted to invite you over to stay at my place for the celebration."

In the above quote can I say:

It’s my birthday coming up and I want to invite you over to stay at my place for the celebration.

OR

It’s my birthday coming up and I would like to invite you over to stay at my place for the celebration.

And by "wanted" does it mean that he was thinking of inviting her in the past, before writing the letter?

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Yes, those are interchangeable in this context. Would like is slightly more polite, and want more to the point, but it's not a big difference.

As for your second question - yes, wanted does imply he was thinking about it in the past, but unless there's a reason for the listener to doubt that it's the case in the present, it doesn't really matter - if you tell someone, say:

I wanted to let you know about it.

no one should be confused as to whether you still do.

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    In BrE at least, "I wanted to let you know ..." or "I just wanted to to..." are not really about the past at all but are, like "I would like to let you know...", polite ways of avoiding the word "want" which tends to be regarded as too direct in ordinary use (except by chief executives, politicians etc). – JeremyC Aug 1 '18 at 8:37

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