1

I "wanted" to ask you ...? /wɒn.tɪd/ , but sometimes I heard /ˈwɒnɪd/ or something like /ˈwɒnidt/ Are there any differences between them?

For example, you can also see and hear these two sentences here and how do they (native speakers) pronounce "wanted" in two different ways: enter image description here

2

In the examples you give, the first has a British accent, and the second has an American accent

Britons and Americans are both lazy about the letter "t" but in different ways

Britons tend to reduce the "t" to a glottal stop so wanted becomes wan'id. The British speaker is pronouncing the "t", but it is reduced.

Americans tend to flap the "t" before an unstressed syllable. It is this flap sound that is confusing you.

| improve this answer | |
1

I believe this is called "glottalizing", where one syllable in a word is weaker than the other and the leading "t" in the weaker is almost dropped. Other examples would be where an American says "waw-der" for "water", or where a Scottish person says "Sco'ish". More details here.

It has no effect on meaning.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.