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Most important, it turns us against the very entity that holds the capacity to address society’s most pressing problems and on which democracy and freedom depend, our own government.

I need a help. Is there someone who could analyse the sentence grammatically?

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First read this this answer for the grammatical reference: Why is the subject placed in the end of this sentence?


Then try to follow along with your own sentence: B -> A (reverse)

[conjunction] Most important,

[adjunct B] it turns us against

[subject A] the very entity that holds the capacity to address society’s most pressing problems and on which democracy and freedom depend, our own government.


Compare with this simple sentence:

A --> B (ordinary)

His bad manners threw [subject A]
me off immediately. [adjunct B]

B --> A (reverse)

There was something in his behaviour that threw me off immediately, [ adjunct B]

his bad manners. [subject A]

*Notice the subject of something in the first part of the sentence. It does the same job as the word entity in your example.

In English grammar, a delayed subject is a subject that appears at (or near) the end of a sentence, after the main verb. In such cases, the vacant subject position at the beginning is usually filled with a dummy word, such as it, there, or here.

It comes from this article: What Are Delayed Subjects in English Grammar? You can see if that's of any use to you.

  • I didn't downvote this btw... but I think you're aiming too high for most readers. I'm a native & I don't actually understand it... I do it without thinking, grammar is not my strong suit at all. This may in fact be the 'perfect answer' where mine is just a poke in the general direction of how to disassemble the sentence, but as I don't know what an adjunct is (nor most of the rest;) it just leaves me more confused. – Tetsujin Aug 2 '18 at 19:23
  • Thanks for sharing your opinion. I don't see neither answer better than the other; it's just there are people seeking straightforward answers and those who like to get to the bottom of their problems. P.S. Adjunct is the phrase that gives extra information in a sentence. I guess here, we could roughly call it the part where the indirect object lives. – Aduku Aug 4 '18 at 5:22
4

Just take the [rather overblown] comparison out of the middle to make it easier...

Most important, it turns us against the very entity that holds the capacity to address society’s most pressing problems and on which democracy and freedom depend, our own government.

Breaks into...

a statement

Most important, it turns us against our own government.

& a descriptor

[our own government is] the very entity that holds the capacity to address society’s most pressing problems and on which democracy and freedom depend,

  • Thank you so much :) What about "Most important, ..."? Is it cool to start a sentence with 'Most important, " or 'More important, "? – heooo Aug 3 '18 at 2:55

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