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Where is the best place to add "most of you"?

Since I found out that you, my darling friends, are trying hard to become great doctors, I decided to choose an interesting subject.

Imagine, you're at a medical conference and you are addressing the audience. You say: "Since I found out that you, my darling friends are trying hard to become great doctors..." Stop till here. Well, so far as you say, you suddenly realize that the usage of the word "you" was wrong(= and actually all of the people at the conference are not trying to become doctors, some of them have another plans, for example two out of twenty intend to be attorney ). In such a situation, how do you correct your mistake?

Note: If the addition of "most of you" is impossible, we are allowed to add anything that we want in each part of the text.

closed as unclear what you're asking by James K, user3169, Jason Bassford, Tyler James Young, Andrew Aug 7 '18 at 2:51

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    I don't understand the question. Do we need to add "most of you" or are we not allowed to write "most of you". Who says that we are not allowed? Who wrote the quoted text? Why do we want to add "most of you"? what are you trying to say? – James K Aug 5 '18 at 16:52
  • @JamesK Imagine, you're talking and engage in conversation. You say: Since I found out that you, my darling friends are trying hard to become great doctors... Stop till here. Well, so far as you say, you suddenly realize that the usage of the word "you" was wrong(= and actually all of your friends are not trying to become doctors, some of them have another plans). In such a situation, how do you correct your mistake? – AmirhoseinRiazi Aug 5 '18 at 19:12
  • @AmirhoseinRiazi What aspect of English is unclear to you when you approach this question? "You" on its own can refer to any number of people. Are you asking about how to phrase a clarifying statement? Are you asking how scope of the original statement could be made more clear to the listener? Are you solving a specific problem? What is your guess? – Tyler James Young Aug 6 '18 at 23:05
  • @TylerJames If, in an important conversation, you wanted to point to the attendees at the conference hall and say "you" instead of saying "most of you", how do you correct this mistake? – AmirhoseinRiazi Aug 7 '18 at 7:15
  • @AmirhoseinRiazi It isn't a mistake. "You" can refer to any number of people. – Tyler James Young Aug 22 '18 at 19:31
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A couple ways to rephrase it. There are undoubtedly more.

  1. My darling friends, since I found out that most of you are, of course, trying hard to become great doctors, I decided to choose an interesting subject.

or

  1. Since I found out that you, my darling friends, (or at least, most of you) are trying hard to become great doctors, I decided to choose an interesting subject.

The second choice is convoluted, and therefore maybe not "recommended" or "elegant", but nevertheless in casual spoken English you can interrupt yourself and interject a comment about "most" instead of "all".

  • The second way looks more interesting, but I doubt a little about whether it sounds usual & common in everyday English or not. – AmirhoseinRiazi Aug 5 '18 at 20:05
  • In conversation it doesn't sound overly unusual. Sometimes during speeches, you wish to sound casual and conversational. Then it could fit. Otherwise, the first sentence is relatively more proper. – Sam Aug 5 '18 at 20:14
  • The OP ask if you say the part up to "great doctors", how do you then correct your error. This answer doesn't fit the question as posed. – James K Aug 5 '18 at 20:15
  • @JamesK, that is a comical constraint, if the sentence has already been spoken, you can't go back in time to correct it. If you can go back in time, let's reword the whole sentence and fix it. – Sam Aug 5 '18 at 20:24
  • @AmirhoseinRiazi, by throwing in a random "of course", as now shown in sentence 1, it sufficiently distracts people from what could be referred to as the "mediocre doctor" problem, elucidated by James. – Sam Aug 6 '18 at 11:21
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You can't just add "most of you". Instead, you either just get it wrong (they will understand). Alternatively, you can add a spoken parenthesis.

There is a problem with just adding "most of you". Think about it, If "most are trying hard to become great doctors", do you mean that "some are trying hard to become mediocre doctors" or "some are not trying hard". So what you say depends on what you mean:

Since I found out that you, my darling friends, are trying hard to become great doctors (or nurses, psychologists and so on). I decided to choose an interesting subject.

The parenthesis might sound more natural if it is personalised

... (Well, we also have a couple of psychologists, and Mary, who is determined to follow her dream of becoming an interior designer, but I digress) ...

It sounds very odd to address people at a conference as "darling friends". you should consider rephrasing that.

  • "Since I found out that you, my darling friends, are trying hard to become great doctors (or engineers, lawyers and so on)..." This is not acceptable, you know, you did not consider that most of the people in the conference hall want to become great doctors, and in this regard the subject of that conference is medical and rationally it's NOT Industrial, legal, etc. – AmirhoseinRiazi Aug 5 '18 at 19:55
  • What conference hall? How am I supposed to know what the subject of the conference is when you don't mention it in your question. Why are your "darling friends" all invited to a conference. This isn't a conversation with friends. This is some kind of Plenary session at a medical conference. If you don't make your question clear don't expect us to be able to read your mind. I've edited the question now to remove mention of "friends" and include the fact that this is a speech to a medical conference – James K Aug 5 '18 at 20:02
  • You're right, but I DID NOT really want to say this because it IS NOT a very formal meeting, and all the members of the conference are my close friends. – AmirhoseinRiazi Aug 5 '18 at 20:12

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