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What is the difference between the two sentences given below?

You cannot have it both ways.
You cannot have it in both ways.

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The phrase both ways refers to a pair of options or choices. The statement You cannot have it both ways normally is used to say that these options are mutually exclusive: you can have the one or the other but not both.

You can live out in the country or in the city. You cannot have it both ways.

The pronoun it there refers vaguely to an existential condition.

The phrase in both ways is similar, but with the addition of the preposition in, it refers to a pair of choices respecting the manner of something.

You can have your ice-cream in a dish, or you can have an ice-cream cone; you cannot have it in both ways.

The pronoun it there refers to ice-cream, and both ways refers to the manner of serving it, in a dish or on a cone.

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The meaning is the same. The order of words gets tested in relation to parallel structures.

The phrases that follow BOTH must be parallel. Both your sentences follow this rule "both ways" and "in both ways" are parallel.

But this specific phrase, I mean, "somebody can’t have it both ways" used to say that someone cannot have the advantages that come from two separate situations because they cannot exist together:

It’s either me or her. You can’t have it both ways.

Saying "It’s either me or her. You can’t have it in both ways" is not wrong, but it sounds a little weird to me.

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