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It is from Crash Course World History. It is at around 2 minute and 4 second. Here it goes:

But when you boil all the unnecessarily fancy words out of that quote, that sounds like people I am very interested in learning about. In fact, I love some fallicentuousness.

closed as off-topic by Tᴚoɯɐuo, Nathan Tuggy, user3169, choster, shin Aug 9 '18 at 5:36

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  • If I had to guess, I'd say it looks like a typo for felicitousness. – J.R. Aug 8 '18 at 8:07
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is based on a mis-hearing. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 8 '18 at 13:03
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Before that he says (my brackets):

The historian James Murdoch called the Heian aristocracy

An ever pullulating-brood of greedy, needy, frivolous, dilletanti--as often as not foully licentious, utterly effeminate, incapable of any worthy achievement.

But when you boil all the unnecessarily fancy words out of that quote, that sounds like people I'm very interested in. In fact, I love some [fallicentuousness].

Well, going off of this transcription, it sounds like he's making up his own fancy word, possibly poking fun that all the big words used in the historian's quote. It could be combination of a few different words, but I'm not exactly sure of which ones.

I'm guessing you copied your version from the closed captioning. If I understand correctly, that's often automated and does necessarily accurately reflect the speaker's words. Upon listening to the video, I believe he might be saying

In fact, I love some foul licentiousness.

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