0

I wrote:

I recognized issues that America's civilization has not went deep enough to them yet.

One of the online grammar assistant tools suggests changing my sentence to "has not gone". Is my sentence correct? I am not sure if the whole sentence requires restructuring.

3
  • 1
    I agree that 'has not gone' would appear to be the correct tense. Even with this correction I am not sure what you are trying to say. Are you saying that the American people have not previously thought deeply enough about the issues that you recognised?
    – James
    Commented Aug 10, 2018 at 15:11
  • The meaning is the American (or name any country I want, I am just using America as an exaple) government have not previously thought deeply enough about the issues that you recognised? Commented Aug 10, 2018 at 15:14
  • 1
    In that case, simply say, 'I recognized issues that the American government has not thought about deeply enough.'
    – James
    Commented Aug 10, 2018 at 15:22

1 Answer 1

-1

Is my sentence correct?

No

But the real problem is with the other part of the sentence. The words “go deep enough to them yet” don’t make any sense when put together in that order.

Is it ok to say 'have went'?

Yes and no

Yes, many many native English speakers in America are starting to say “have went” instead of “have gone” but, no, the Brits still look down on it... and so do the Americans. It’s considered idiomatic, lower class, and less educated. You may have picked it up from American TV or an American native, but you should stick to “have gone” in your own grammar for now.

4
  • 1
    Many speakers of AmE consider have went ungrammatical/non-standard as well.
    – TimR
    Commented Aug 10, 2018 at 22:46
  • @Tᴚoɯɐuo What's your point? The answer already says that.
    – lly
    Commented Aug 11, 2018 at 3:40
  • 1
    I just wanted to clarify that it's considered non-standard here too, since you say that it is "OK": "... many, many native English speakers in America are starting to say "have went"..." [my emphasis]. A relatively small percentage of AmE speakers say "have went" and the overwhelming majority of speakers say "have gone". I also believe these speakers, their parents, and grandparents and their ancestors have always said have went. It isn't a recent development, as is implied by "starting to say".
    – TimR
    Commented Aug 11, 2018 at 12:29
  • And again you'd be mistaken. Go follow the link.
    – lly
    Commented Aug 11, 2018 at 14:39

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .