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Under the extra-inning rules, each half inning beyond regulation is started with a runner on second base. The runner is either the ninth batter due to bat in the current inning, or a pinch-runner if the batting team so chooses.

I see this sentence in this article. "So choose" seems to be an idiom. I also found another example on this site:

I have two free concert tickets for tomorrow. We can see the concert at 7 pm and still be home in time to catch mom and dad before they leave. If you are not into it, just let me know and I can still sell the tickets in a split second. We can still watch the concert on TV if you so choose.

It has an explanation about the phrase:

'If you so choose" is used when a person is given an option of choosing between different things.

But with that limited explanation, I still can not get the phrase thoroughly. Can someone help to elaborate it based on the given examples above?

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It's a more succinct way of expressing "you can do X if you (want/choose/decide) to do X."

...or a pinch-runner if the batting team so chooses.

Can be reworded as

...or a pinch-runner if the batting team chooses to do so.

Or

We can still watch the concert on TV if you so choose.

can be reworded as

We can still watch the concert on TV if that is your choice.

  • So, in the second context, I am not clear what 'your choice' is? – dan Aug 12 '18 at 2:39
  • @dan my choice is to "watch the concert on TV". The immediate antecedent of the "if you so choose" phrase. – John Feltz Aug 12 '18 at 2:48
  • Can this structure be applied to other words? Like, so want, so decide, so like,.... – dan Aug 14 '18 at 2:33

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