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I’ve been reading online that people who purchased that record have not received it so I’m assuming he is being slow to ship

this is an email I received: my enquiry was about a record I bought but have not received .

I'd like to know why the author of this email used the continuous form, why not the simple form ? Is it because every time he has gone on line he has read it, I don't think so

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The use of present perfect continuous (or present perfect progressive) implies this is ongoing, i.e. Present perfect progressive tense describes an action that began in the past, continues in the present, and may continue into the future. If it happened a few times in the past only, your correspondent might have sent the following.

I’ve read online that people who purchased that record have not received it so I’m assuming he is being slow to ship.

  • but i've read means it began in the past but goes up to now but not continuously. I know that progressive is for ongoing action but what is ongoing the fact of reading? . How many reading can you do before using the progressive form and futhermore if it happened only in the past he would have used past simple read – user5577 Aug 12 '18 at 20:51
  • There are subtle differences in the language, and in reality, native English speakers might choose different ways to say the same thing. I've read is strictly the past, though, but not including the present. BTW, 'readings' is the plural of 'reading'. – DrMoishe Pippik Aug 12 '18 at 22:07
  • The act of reading itself may be in the past but the knowledge continuous into the present, so if I have read a book, I have finished reading but I know the content now. In your example "I've been reading" means a number of times, over a period of time continuing into the present. – anouk Mar 17 at 16:03

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