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When I walked on the way home after school, I found that someone had dropped his purse.

Is this a correct answer?

closed as unclear what you're asking by Tetsujin, Nathan Tuggy, user3169, kiamlaluno, Lucian Sava Aug 16 '18 at 7:05

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    There's nothing remotely unusual about using both when and after in contexts such as yours, but on the way is completely non-idiomatic in that exact sentence. More specifically, either use adverbial When I walked home [something happened] or adverbial On the way home [something happened], but don't try to use both at once (but in both cases it's fine to include the additional adverbial element after school). – FumbleFingers Aug 12 '18 at 14:51
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More idiomatic would be the use of a continuous tense, to indicate this happened in the midst of the trip home.

While I was walking on the way home after school, I found that someone had dropped a purse.

Or as a subordinate clause,

While walking on the way home after school, I found someone had dropped a purse.

BTW, if you don't know who dropped it, why use his purse? It could have been her purse... or some neologism for the pronoun. Using the indefinite article is a better alternative, here.

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Walked on the way home or walking on the way home isn't something we would say. More idiomatic sentences might be (and yes, you would typically use the continuous tense as DrMoishe Pippik says):

While I was walking home from school, I found that someone had dropped a purse.
On the way home from school, I found that someone had dropped a purse.
While I was walking home from school, I found on the way that someone had dropped a purse.

The first sentence is more typical of what we would most often see, because if something happens while you're walking home from school, it happens on the way as well. So you don't need to mention it. The second one isn't saying quite the same thing, because you could be driving home, taking the bus, or finding another way home. The last one fits all of your ideas in, in a way that is idiomatically correct, but again, it's less typical than the first sentence.

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