2

Question:

Which part of the sentence below is grammatically wrong. Explain why.


Sentence: The whole thing moves around the concept of building a small dynamic organization into a larger one.

Or, as printed on the test:

The whole thing moves /(A) around the concept of building a small dynamic /(B) organization into a larger one /(C)
/(D - No error)

Part - A is "The whole thing moves"
Part - B is "around the concept of building a small dynamic"
Part - C is "organization into a larger one"
Part - D is "No error"


My attempt:

The whole sentence seemed perfectly fine to me and I went for option D (no error). However, many people said the part - organization into a larger one - is wrong, but their reasons varied.


My query:

Which part is actually wrong and why?

10
  • Which one is c?
    – Maulik V
    Feb 17 '14 at 12:45
  • Part C is "organization into a larger one" Feb 17 '14 at 12:46
  • 1
    building --> transforming since it used into?
    – Maulik V
    Feb 17 '14 at 12:53
  • 1
    The word choices used in this sentence is rather unfamiliar to me, and unless we wanted to be hyper-correct I would say there is no problem with it. a) building ... into ... though sounds a little odd is acceptable (I did a quick check and it seems many people use it when talking about business or enterprises); b) a small dynamic organization might need a comma, i.e. a small, dynamic organization; and c) some might argue that a small X into a larger one is bad English and it should be either a smaller X into a larger one or a small X into a large one, but it doesn't trouble me. Feb 17 '14 at 13:23
  • 4
    I don't think there is an error, really. If anything, though, I'd say “moves around” is an odd choice, and I'd probably go with “revolves around” or “hinges on” instead. People might think that “organization” is misspelled if they’ve never seen that spelling before. Feb 17 '14 at 15:55
1

The sentence is grammatically correct but poorly worded. Hence it sounds wrong.

If it were written as

The whole project revolves around the concept of building a small dynamic organization into a larger one.

it is grammatically equivalent, but sounds much better.

-1

Part C is wrong. While other parts could have been better.

A: "The whole thing moves " could be improved as "The whole thing revolves" B: talks about "building" C: if in B it was " developing" instead of building, then the Part C is perfect. But here, If we read B and C together, we see that we cannot build a small organisation into larger one, we can develop, improve, enhance, transform, but never build. This is because, building refers to making the whole, while the discussion here is about a transformation from small to large. Part C, then , could be corrected as simply "organisation in a larger one." Combining all parts , you can read this as

"The whole thing moves /(A) around the concept of building a small dynamic /(B) organization in a larger one /" , this could be an explanation for developing a startup spirit/entrepreneurship in a big company.

Hence Part C is wrong.

5
  • But yet, Merriam-Webster defines the verb build, sense 4: "increase, enlarge" merriam-webster.com/dictionary/build
    – nohat
    Feb 18 '14 at 7:09
  • you cannot increase a small company into bigger, you cannot enlarge it, it is applicable to objects.
    – AAI
    Feb 18 '14 at 7:28
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    @AjeyaAnand vice versa... since it's using 'into' I'd vote for part 2 as to have transformed!
    – Maulik V
    Feb 18 '14 at 7:34
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    @AjeyaAnand not sure what you're trying to argue here, but this use of "build into" can be found frequently in major professionally-edited publications like Fortune and The Washington Post. e.g. "... Michael Dell, who dropped out of college to assemble computers, would build his business into a behemoth", "But to raise the capital to build his business into a major securities firm, Mason...", "... he joined a small and very struggling company called Haloid, and he helped build that company into the powerhouse that became Xerox". corpus.byu.edu/coca/?c=coca&q=28571552
    – nohat
    Feb 18 '14 at 7:58
  • 1
    "Building X into Y" is simlar to saying "turning X into Y" or "changing X into Y". All of these use "into" and not "in". Feb 18 '14 at 10:59

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