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From NPR

Then Underwood started the car, closed the garage door, and walked away.

I thought walk away usually meant a person move away using his/her feet, but here doesn't. Underwood used the car to walk away, why? Can walk away be used in such situation where a person uses the bicycle, car, or something alike?

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    It sounds more like Underwood locked someone (who was unconscious) in a car, closed the garage door, and left that person dying slowly. – Damkerng T. Feb 17 '14 at 13:46
  • @DamkerngT. Why did Underwood start the car? If he only wanted to leave a person alone, he should shut the car off. – Searene Feb 17 '14 at 14:23
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    I think Underwood wanted to kill that person by Carbon monoxide poisoning. According to CDC, "People who are sleeping or intoxicated can die from CO poisoning before ever experiencing symptoms". I've heard someone died because they slept in their own car leaving the air condition (and of course the engine) turned on a few times. – Damkerng T. Feb 17 '14 at 14:31
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    @DamkerngT.'s comments are spot on. You can also use "walk away" in a non-literal context. E.g. "If you find yourself in a bad situation, just walk away." "Walk away" here refers to "getting out" of the situation - whether by walking or other means. – JMB Feb 17 '14 at 15:03
  • @DamkerngT. Thank you. I get it. Sometimes I feel that some comment is the best answer, just like yours. But it seems I cannot set a comment as the accepted answer. :) – Searene Feb 18 '14 at 5:04
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The walk away is used as a phrasal verb.

Walk away - go away from (so, it's clear here that walk-away is more about leaving from that situation/scene.)

Underwood used the car to walk away, why? He neither drove the car nor did he ride in that case.

Additional note: The fun is if you use walkaway as a single word, it becomes a noun and means an easy victory. The link is same for that.

  • Yes, he just walk away, not driving a car. Thanks for your quotation. – Searene Feb 18 '14 at 5:10
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Then Underwood started the car, closed the garage door, and walked away.

I thought walk away usually meant a person move away using his/her feet

It does!

, but here doesn't.

You are incorrect. Actually, it does mean this.

Underwood used the car to walk away, why?

Underwood did not use the car to walk away, he used his feet.

Can walk away be used in such situation where a person uses the bicycle, car, or something alike?

That would be odd.

Now let's look at the scene in which this "walking away" happens. It has to do with Underwood murdering an underling named Peter Russo by leaving the drunk Russo in his car with the engine running, in a closed garage. The fumes build up in the garage, come into the car and Russo dies of poisoning.

The excerpt from the audio, which is faithfully represented in the link to the transcript which you provide is thus:

SPACEY: (As Frank Underwood) Whatever it is you have to face tomorrow, you don't have to face it now. Right now, it's just you and me.

COREY STOLL: (As Peter Russo) I failed myself. I failed my family. I'm so tired.

SPACEY: (As Frank Underwood) You just close your eyes.

DEGGANS: Then Underwood started the car, closed the garage door, and walked away. That murder transformed Underwood from an antihero into a straight-up villain.

(The summary of Season 1, Episode 11 on wikipedia confirms this for us:

Frank picks [a drunk Russo] up from jail and, recognizing him to be too much of a liability, proceeds to kill Russo through carbon monoxide poisoning, making it look like a suicide.)

Russo is left to die in the car. Underwood walks away on his feet.

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