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Look at these below sentences:

Rain falling on the roof is making a noise.

Rain falling on the roof makes a noise.

Rain falls on the roof is making a noise.

Rain falls on the roof makes a noise.

1.What's the difference among these sentences in meaning?

2.Are they all correct?

1

Let's look at these sentences:

Rain falling on the roof is making a noise.

This is an observation about a particular instance in which the rain is making a certain noise. You are saying that there's a specific sound caused by this rain. You could also say: The rain falling on the roof is making a noise.

Rain falling on the roof makes a noise.

This is a general observation about how rain makes noise when it falls on a rooftop. It's not describing a particular time, because rain does not have the definite article the.

Rain falls on the roof is making a noise.

Rain falls on the roof makes a noise.

These two sentences are grammatically incorrect. They are considered "run-on senteces," because you have to use the conjunction "and" to join two phrases together. For example: Rain falls on the roof and is making a noise. You can read about run-on sentences here: https://academicguides.waldenu.edu/writingcenter/grammar/runonsentences

  • But why can't I say "rain which is falling on the roof is making a noise instead of "rain falling on the roof is making a noise. – kuldeep sharma Aug 14 '18 at 5:42
  • Hi @kuldeepsharma, you can say The rain, which is falling on the roof,... Or better: Rain that's falling on the roof – Ringo Aug 14 '18 at 20:45
  • When you use "which," it implies specific rain, so it sounds better to use the definite article The – Ringo Aug 14 '18 at 20:46

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