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As far as I know, in the sentences like "I took my umbrella just in case it rains", we can drop "just", so:

  • "I took my umbrella just in case it rains"

and:

  • "I took my umbrella in case it rains"

are interchangeable. Am I right?

What about the sentences we end with "just in case" (the sentences we don't say anything after "just in case") like "I took my umbrella just in case."? Can we drop "just" in those kinds of sentences too? I guess we can't drop it in those kinds of sentences.

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There are two distinct possibilities:

I took my umbrella in case it might rain

I took my umbrella just in case

"just in case" is a stock phrase, it means "in the event that something (usually something unwanted) happens".

"in case" simply means "in the event that"

  • Thanks. So, can't we say "I took my umbrella in case." instead of "I took my umbrella just in case."? – Fire and Ice Aug 14 '18 at 13:31
  • No, it would be incomplete. It would leave the reader wondering "in case what?" – Dr Sitecore Aug 14 '18 at 13:32
  • Thank you again. I'm right that "I took my umbrella just in case it rains" and "I took my umbrella in case it rains" are interchangeable, aren't I? – Fire and Ice Aug 14 '18 at 13:43
  • @FireandIce - This happens a lot when the question in your title doesn't match the question in the body of your question – you may get an answer to one or the other but not both. – J.R. Aug 14 '18 at 13:46
  • @J.R. I have two very related questions. I think I didn't need to open two different topics for them. – Fire and Ice Aug 14 '18 at 13:49

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