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In the sentence below can I use "when" instead of "during which time"?

The rise of the using of cell-phones was particularly noticeable between 1999 and 2002, during which time the use of mobile phones tripled.

  • As noted by Paul Childs: The rise **of** the **using** of cell-phones [...] would more likely be phrase as The rise **in** the **usage** of cell-phones [...]. That sentence repeats itself, and could be reduced to The rise in the usage of mobile phones tripled between 1999 and 2002. However, this would not preserve the order in which the information is presented, which affects the emphasis. Substituting phrases avoids the internal repetition: The rise **in popularity** of cell-phones was particularly noticeable between 1999 and 2002, during which time **mobile phone use tripled** – Matthew Willcockson Aug 20 '18 at 5:38
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Yes, though more importantly you should have "The rise of the use of..." or better "The rise in cell-phone usage..."

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    This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. - From Review – user3169 Aug 20 '18 at 1:30
  • How does "yes" not answer a yes/no question? – Paul Childs Aug 20 '18 at 3:18
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    @PaulChilds I feel the answer can have more information: Which phrase is more appropriate, or more likely to be used in this context, and why? Your answer is one word, while your suggestion is many more. Also, as user3169 pointed out, critiques of the author's question should go in the comments on the question itself. – Matthew Willcockson Aug 20 '18 at 5:43

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