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I have formulated several sentences in daily usage as below (describing time), but I am not sure which is or are correct.

A: Can I take this coach (at or on) any time of tomorrow?
B: Can I take it anytime tomorrow?

C: We will arrive at the pier tomorrow afternoon.
D: We will arrive at the pier on the afternoon of tomorrow.

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For A: Use at any time (not on any time), and don't use of before tomorrow:

Can I take this coach at any time tomorrow?

For B: The sentence is fine:

Can I take this coach anytime tomorrow?

For C: The sentence sounds like fluent, idiomatic English.

For D: Again, don't use of before tomorrow; also, it's generally in the afternoon, not on the afternoon:

We will arrive at the pier in the afternoon tomorrow.

Although we could also word that as:

We will arrive at the pier tomorrow afternoon.

and we'd use the preposition on if we were using the name of a specific day:

We will arrive at the pier on Tuesday afternoon.
We will arrive at the pier in the afternoon on Tuesday.

(As a footnote, I wouldn't argue that "on the afternoon of tomorrow" is ungrammatical, it's just clunky and I'd recommend avoiding it.)

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    Interestingly, we do say say things like on the morning after the accident, on the evening of the twenty-first, or on the night when he proposed, but I can't think of a construction where on the afternoon sounds natural. – choster Aug 20 '18 at 15:03

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