2

For example:

My message is: If you want to approach someone, listen to your gut and do it. Nice people are truly hard to find and it is always worth a while to spend 5 minutes talking to them and see for yourself how they are.

This part after the first sentence is also part of "my message":

Nice people are truly hard to find and it is always worth a while to spend 5 minutes talking to them and see for yourself how they are.

Should I put this sentence in the same sentence as "my message" to tell my readers that it is also part of my message?

3

Any ambiguity between both sentences being your message or just one sentence being your message can be removed with the use of either quotation marks, a block quote, or something involving numbered list items.


My message is: "If you want to approach someone, listen to your gut and do it. Nice people are truly hard to find and it is always worthwhile to spend 5 minutes talking to them and see for yourself how they are."


My message is:

If you want to approach someone, listen to your gut and do it. Nice people are truly hard to find and it is always worthwhile to spend 5 minutes talking to them and see for yourself how they are.


My message is that (1) if you want to approach someone, listen to your gut and do it; and (2) nice people are truly hard to find and it is always worthwhile to spend 5 minutes talking to them and see for yourself how they are.


Note that I made a minor change and replaced worth a while with worthwhile.

Another alternative would be to put both sentences in italics.

The particular choice is one of preference and would likely be guided by the content of the rest of the text and how it's presented.

1

Ideally you want one sentence to be the main message or the thesis statement of your paper. I'd try to work them together to make a more coherent message. When you have two or more sentences that are supposed to be your message, it might be confusing as to the main point of the paper.

For example:

If you want to approach someone, it's worth the 5 minute risk talking to them to see for yourself how they truly are.

This way, you have a clear and concise message (risking 5 minutes is worth discovering who the person is). The rest of your essay can be spent supporting your claim.

  • I agree with your point, but I'm having a hard time applying it to the question. You're describing something like the topic sentence in a paragraph. It introduces the concept and then the rest of the paragraph explains it. With a paragraph, the block structure indicates that the whole thing goes together as a related thought. In the OP's case, the multiple sentences might be within a larger paragraph. The question becomes how do you make it clear what's part of the actual message vs. supplementary commentary. (cont'd) – fixer1234 Aug 23 '18 at 16:32
  • Is your point that the message, itself, should be reduced to a single sentence, so whether or not the following sentence(s) are actually part of it is moot? – fixer1234 Aug 23 '18 at 16:32
  • @fixer1234 Im saying "the message" should really be referred to as a thesis statement. A thesis statement should be reduced to a single sentence if both of the sentences make up the thesis statement. All other sentences should support the thesis, so they are not moot. OP could have a thesis with 2 sentences, but that's pretty uncommon and not good practice IMO. – Crettig Aug 23 '18 at 21:29

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