1

I have a question about the following sentences concerning the word much:

  1. He is as hated as loved.
  2. He is as much hated as loved.
  3. He is as hated as much loved.
  4. He is as much hated as much loved.

Do the use and non-use of word much make any differences?

1

Yes, they make a large difference. Much alone (as an adjective or adverb) means great in degree:

How loved is he? He is much loved. How hated is he? He is much hated.

In contrast, as much as implies an equivalence or inequality:

How much is he hated? He is hated [at least] as much as he is loved.

This sentence can be shortened to the equivalent

He is as much hated as loved.

or the even shorter but less common

He is as hated as loved.

Thus, 1 and 2 make sense, and 2 sounds more natural.

0

He is as hated as loved.grammatical but "stilted" to my AmEar

He is as much hated as loved. idiomatic

He is as hated as much loved. ungrammatical

He is as much hated as much loved. ungrammatical

  • You could have 'he is as much hated as he is loved'. – Michael Harvey Aug 23 '18 at 19:41
  • @Michael Harvey: Sure. I'm just responding to OP's list. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 23 '18 at 19:48

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