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God, she’d love to get out of here!

Could you please tel me what God exactly means here?

The fuller text is:

Lauren examines a broken fingernail, trying to recall whether she brought a nail file with her. She glances at all the gloomy faces around her. No one appears to be enjoying themselves—even if they wanted to, it would be in bad taste. Candice going off to the library to work, as if nothing has happened, seems a bit callous. God, she’d love to get out of here! And it’s barely past lunchtime. She wonders how much longer they will be trapped in this hotel.

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God is used in this case as an interjection:

used for expressing strong feelings such as anger, surprise, or worry. Note that: some people consider this expression offensive”.

  • God! Would you shut up for a minute?
  • My God, you scared me!
  • Oh my God, are you all right?

(Macmillan Dictionary)

13

Some people in societies with a Christian tradition use the names of sacred figures such as God, Jesus, etc, as an oath or exclamation, particularly to intensify an utterance, often with an exclamation mark afterwards, e.g. God! It's hot today; Jesus! I'm tired. Some Roman Catholics invoke the entire "Holy Family" - Jesus, Mary and Joseph! I want a drink! Using these words in this way does not necessarily imply strong religious belief, in fact many Christians consider such swearing to be wrong, and a form of profanity.

  • I never understood this - How is calling god's name construed as swearing? If someone were to say "My Donald! I so need a haircut!", is that disrespectful to Mr Trump? – goelakash Aug 26 '18 at 9:36
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    @goelakash It may be considered a violation of the Commandment to not "take the Lord's name in vain". – aschepler Aug 26 '18 at 9:45
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    @goelakash: Not swearing as in cussing (cursing) but as in telling the truth. It is a shortened form of By God, that is, an invocation of God to attest to the truthfulness of the utterance. We swear by something, for example, by all that is holy. It is an (exclamatory) oath. God, it's hot today! or Jeez it's cold in here!. It would be very ironic to invoke Trump in that context. By Trump, I'm innocent, I say. Innocent! But speakers have long lost the sense that an oath is involved. It's merely a very strong emphatic. Jesus Mary and Joseph, what the fuck are you doing? – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 26 '18 at 10:58
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    Some Christians take the position that using God's name to intensify trivial statements, e.g. that it is hot today, or that one is hungry, is wrong and debases God. Some may allow the use of God's name to intensify a solemn statement, e.g. that one, in a court of law, promises to tell the truth. Others consider even this to be wrong. – Michael Harvey Aug 26 '18 at 11:05
  • @goelakash people conflate many meanings when they says that such utterances are "swearing". Literally, swearing is making an oath, and making an oath before God that you need a haircut -- as mentioned by Micheal Harvey and aschepler --trivializes something which should be solemn and grave. Most "swear" words are really "foul language". – RonJohn Aug 26 '18 at 18:11
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God in your example is used to emphasize what you are saying when you are surprised, annoyed, or amused (Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English).

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Visitor @goelakash says in a comment that it's not clear how swearing is involved, and asks whether a living person, a president, say, can be invoked merely by name in such a locution.

It's not swearing as in cussing (cursing) but as in telling the truth. The exclamation is a shortened form of By God, that is, an invocation of God to attest to the truthfulness of the utterance. We swear by something, for example, "by all that is holy".

God, it's hot today! or Jeez it's cold in here!

Speakers have long lost the sense that an oath is involved when using these exclamations. They are merely very strong emphatics and can express intense emotion, such as anger or dismay or alarm.

Jesus Mary and Joseph, what the f--k are you doing to my car!?

To swear by a living person or some other ad hoc entity, we need to use the preposition by.

By the Trump brand, I'm telling the truth, I say! The god's honest truth!

P.S. Speakers who consider such language truly offensive are a small minority. The speech of many people who are good and devout, and who are kind and charitable to others, is peppered with such "oaths". But on those occasions that require propriety most of them would rein themselves in.

P.P.S. I've spelled the word f--k only because the answer might get censored otherwise.

1

Although there is no "!" just after god, it is used as an exclamation. Notice the exclamation at the end of the sentence The author remarks as with how much will or love she wanted to get out of here. She was very willing to get out. One example: "God, how beautiful that painting is!"

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