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Let's say there is a teacher discussing something negative about farmers to students. One of the students reacted instantly, because his parents are farmers, and he said:

Student: Do you have any idea how condescending that just was! (this happened right after his teacher finished the sentence).

Does the bold letters exist, to mean something that has just happened?

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    I think either the student was distracted, and didn't frame his utterance well, or (far more likely, imho) he's not a native Anglophone anyway. I can imagine the possibility of ...how condescending that was just now, but even that sounds pretty "awkward" to me. In the actual version as cited, just seems completely out of place. It's not a natural way of conveying only a short time ago, nor is it a natural context for using just as an "intensifier", as in utterances such as It's just like him to post a comment instead of a proper answer. – FumbleFingers Aug 27 '18 at 13:43
  • If I re-construct it to ''do you have any idea how condescending that is just was'' (-does this exist?) how's that? – John Arvin Aug 27 '18 at 17:35
  • I don't know what you want the word just to mean in this context. The only idiomatic way I can think of to include it is Do you have any idea just how condescending that was? (where it's an "intensifier" for "how condescending", implying very condescending). But you seem to be saying you're interested in using it as per I just saw him (meaning just a moment ago, very recently), and I don't think that would be easily done in your context. – FumbleFingers Aug 27 '18 at 17:59
  • Maybe Do you have any idea how condescending you were just now? I don't know why, but I like it much better when just now (= a moment ago) applies to something a bit more specific than just that (= whatever the teacher just did/said).. – FumbleFingers Aug 27 '18 at 18:04
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Yes, 'just' here indicates something that just happened a moment ago, because 'just' precedes the past tense verb 'was':

Do you have any idea how condescending that was? (any time in the past)
Do you have any idea how condescending that just was? (just a moment ago in the past)

To use 'just' as an intensifier to indicate that something was very condescending, it should precede 'how':

Do you have any idea just how condescending that was? (implying that it was very condescending)

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Apart from the meaning "only a moment ago", just may play the role of intensifier as it does in your sentence, meaning that the teacher's attitude was very patronizing.

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