2

I trying to combine these three sentences

1.Soon usability will be commodity.

2.Usability will be something that user will expect

3.Usability will not be a leverage or key differentiator

I came up with this

Soon usability will be a commodity and it will be something users will expect. It will not be a leverage or key differentiator any more.

Is there any better way

6
  • do clarify further. It's not understandable.
    – Maulik V
    Feb 20 '14 at 5:52
  • is it clear now @MaulikV ? Feb 20 '14 at 6:11
  • Soon, usability will be a commodity that is something the users would expect. This is not going to be a leverage....?
    – Maulik V
    Feb 20 '14 at 6:48
  • If you start with "[ usability will be a commodity ] and [ usability will be something users expect ]", then you can factor out the first three words: "usability will be〔 [ a commodity ] and [ something users expect ] 〕"
    – user230
    Feb 20 '14 at 9:07
  • Somehow I found this use of "commodity" didn't give me an idea of contrast to the second sentence. Feb 20 '14 at 10:16
2

Here's an alternative where 2 out the 3 "will be"s have been removed:

Soon usability will be a commodity, something users will expect and not a leverage or key differentiator any more.

If this version is too long a sentence, here's an alternative:

Soon usability will be a commodity and something users will expect. It will not be a leverage or key differentiator any more.

EDIT

After reading the first alternative once more, I think it reads better if "any more" is moved from the end of the sentence:

Soon usability will be a commodity, something users will expect, and not any more a leverage or key differentiator.

EDIT 2

Or as suggested by @starsplusplus using no longer

Soon usability will be a commodity, something users will expect, and no longer a leverage or key differentiator.

4
  • thanks for your answer but somehow I not comfortable with your options. let me re-factor my question Feb 20 '14 at 14:01
  • Question Edited @Nico Feb 20 '14 at 14:09
  • what in particular does it feel uncomfortable? What about Soon usability will be a commodity, a quality users will expect, and not any more a leverage or key differentiator.?
    – Nico
    Feb 20 '14 at 14:25
  • 1
    I think "any more" sounds more natural on the end of the sentence. If you prefer the other placement, use "no longer" instead of "not any more". Feb 20 '14 at 15:15

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