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Which one is grammatically correct or better?

I have two assignments, One of them is done.

I have two assignments, One of which is done.

I watched a video tutorial that the teacher said the second one is correct and the first one is wrong. But I can not understand why the first one is wrong. He said if you have a quantifier in an adjective clause, You can not use them and should use whom for people and which for objects.

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You don't need to capitalize the o in the word "one" if it is not the first word of a sentence. The tutorial you watched is correct. The reason the first sentence is ungrammatical is because it is a run-on sentence, which is a very common grammar error. A run-on sentence has two or more parts (clauses), each of which can be a stand-alone sentence. (See how my sentence is similar to the sentences are you asking about?) To avoid making run-on sentences, you need to connect these clauses with conjunctions, such as "and", "or", "but".

So the problem with the first sentence is that "them" is not a relative pronoun and the clause is an independent clause. You need a conjunction to connect the two clauses if you want them both in one sentence.

I have two assignments, and one of them is done.

Or alternatively you need to make them two separate sentences, which means you need to replace the comma with a period.

I have two assignments. One of them is done.

The second sentence reads fine as long as you follow the correct sentence case and change "One" to "one".

I have two assignments, one of which is done.

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    Great answer. How about the following two sentences: I have two assignments. One of which is done. Is it grammatical now, please? (I suppose not, but just in case, I check). – Palo May 27 at 21:58
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    @Palo No. Which is a relative pronoun leading a dependent clause, and it needs an antecedent in the same sentence. So if you want to keep which, you'd need to say "I have two assignments, one of which is done." – Eddie Kal May 27 at 22:02

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