1

I come from a different culture than her/she does.

I come from a different culture from her.

Are these sentences grammatically correct?

2

I come from a different culture than her/she does.

"I come from a different culture than her/she does" sounds OK to me, as an American English speaker who uses the "different (...) than..." construction. Of course, speakers who do not use this construction would not find this sentence grammatical in their dialect of English.

I come from a different culture from her.

I don't think it would be considered correct to use the "different (...) from..." construction this way: "I come from a different culture from her" looks like it should mean "I come from a culture that is different from her" = "My culture is different from her". It's comparing two unalike things: a culture and a person. As Lambie said in a comment, it would be correct to use "different ... from" to compare your culture and her culture: "I come from a different culture from hers".

(That said, I don't think this kind of use of the "different (...) from..." construction is totally unheard of, so despite the fact that it seems inconsistent to me, there might still be some people that would say it.)

Another way to say this that I think would not sound awkward to any speakers is "She and I come from different cultures." The use of "She and I" might sound slightly stiff, because using "nominative" pronouns in coordination isn't completely natural for many English speakers, but it's not at all uncommon and it's very rare to run into somebody who considers this usage "incorrect"—I'm only aware of this position being taken by Ron Maimon (see this ELU answer by him).

1

I would try to avoid using 'from' twice in a row in "I come from a different culture from her." Here are alternatives I would try in American English, either using 'than' or refactoring the sentence:

I come from a different culture than she does.
I come from a different culture than her.
I grew up in a different culture from her.
My culture is different from hers.

0

"Different from" is universally recognised as correct.

"Different than" is more common in US English, and "Different to" in British English. Some people would argue that both of these are "wrong", but they are both commonly used.

Ref: https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/usage/different-from-than-or-to

  • 1
    But "a different culture from her" sounds like you're talking about a culture that is different from her. That comparison doesn't make sense: a culture shouldn't be compared to a person. To have parallel structure, it would have to be something like "a different culture from hers". – sumelic Aug 28 '18 at 0:00

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