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How can someone ask a wondering question to make a listener deduce the answer?

Here are a couple of examples to demonstrate what I mean:

A: Is he sad because he lost 1 Bitcoin?
B: He was extremely sad because he lost a couple of dollars yesterday so how would a Bitcoin be?! (or what about a Bitcoin?!)

Second example:

A: Did son gave his mother an expensive present?
B: Last week, he gave a friend a very valuable present so how about his beloved mother?!

I'd like to ask those questions Colloquially (not formal) and a U.S. answer is preferable. Forgive me if I wrote a completely wrong question words. I don't know the right ones.

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    Did the son give [check your verb usage]. That is a very basic thing.
    – Lambie
    Mar 4 at 20:17

1 Answer 1

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He was extremely sad because he lost a couple of dollars yesterday so how would a Bitcoin be?! (or what about a Bitcoin?!)

Both versions are not quite conventional English. You could perhaps said said:

Yesterday, he was extremely sad when he lost a couple of dollars, so you can imagine how sad he would be to lose an entire Bitcoin?!

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Last week, he gave a friend a very valuable present so how about his beloved mother?!

Once again, this is not quite conventional English. You could perhaps said said:

Last week, he gave a friend a very valuable present, so you can imagine how generous he will be to his own beloved mother?!

I note that you have used both an exclamation mark (!) and a question mark (?) at the end of your sentences. This is not a common practice with most English speakers, although some people do this. Generally, English speakers only use either a single question or a single exclamation mark, depending on the requirements of the sentence. If a sentence asks an exclamatory question, then English speakers usually only use an exclamation mark. Incidentally, the use of both marks at the end of a sentence is referred to as an interrobang. Some keyboards, and some word processors have combined both marks into a single character which looks like this '‽'.

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