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Political power, used right, will produce good results.

"used right" means "if it is used right?"

  • Always put the source or some explanation. Is this you read somewhere or you made it? Perfectly framed questions not only help learn us better but also maintain this site's credit. – Maulik V Feb 20 '14 at 11:17
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    That's what it means, but I don't think anything is omitted. – snailcar Feb 20 '14 at 13:58
  • @user4550 Yes, that's exactly what it means. – starsplusplus Feb 20 '14 at 14:11
  • There's a strong argument for saying OP's "used right" is not in fact "used correctly" here. At the very least it should probably be rightly, though even the collocation "power used rightly" only gets a dozen hits on Google Books (but "power used right" gets less than half that). In short, the correct word is correctly, not right. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Feb 24 '14 at 22:42
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    @FumbleFingers Using right as an adverb meaning "correctly" is standard. See e.g. Collins, sense 21. It is true that neither used right nor used rightly is common, however. – snailcar Feb 25 '14 at 18:26
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I understand, as you suggest, that it can stand for:

  • Political power if it is used right will produce good results.

Other alternatives:

  • Political power when it is used right will produce good results.

  • Political power when it is exercised right will produce good results.

  • Or as suggested by @starsplusplus:

    Political power that is used right will produce good results.

  • Or "political power that is used right will produce good results". – starsplusplus Feb 20 '14 at 14:11

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