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A book for improving your speaking skills teaches that you have to use present progressive to sound more impressive instead of adverbs, as for the frequency of a hobby. Like this:

Question: what is your hobby? And how often do you do it...

Answer#1(adverb): I like photography. I often take pictures when I go out.

Or

Answer#2(present progressive): I like photography. I'm always taking pictures

I don't get it. How did it become more impressive than adverbs?

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  • The first version sounds better to me. What book did this come from? Aug 28, 2018 at 22:28
  • "you have to use present progressive to sound more impressive" - As a native English speaker, I don't understand this. There's nothing particularly "impressive" about the present progressive.
    – stangdon
    Aug 28, 2018 at 23:02
  • To all, it's collins speaking for IELTS... I'd say the book is good enough and I've just downloaded from the net coz' a british council lecturer recommended it from Youtube. Anyway, this query that I am asking here is what strikes me wonder why is that too...
    – John Arvin
    Aug 29, 2018 at 10:02
  • Another is, when you use ALWAYS+ING, there's a possibility that there is a negative connotation right?
    – John Arvin
    Aug 29, 2018 at 10:06

1 Answer 1

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Maybe it's just me, but using progressive does sound more impressive to me. In fact, it's not just because of the progressive form of the verb. It's also because of using "always".

Answer#2(present progressive): I like photography. I'm always taking pictures

Using simple present seems to be completely correct in your sentence, but it somehow feels like you are just informing about something, but when you use an adverb like "always" + "present progressive", your way of speaking somehow involves a feeling of excitement and seems to be warmer and more inviting, which makes your sentence sound more impressive.

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    Oh yeah, I get the point! The message is amplified if you add feelings to that always+progressive thing.
    – John Arvin
    Aug 29, 2018 at 15:25

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