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Here is the sentence: I want proof from you that it isn't a scam.

Is the that clause here a misplaced modifier? I want it to complement "proof" not the pronoun object "you" but "from you" is actually separating it from "proof". But if I say "I want proof that it isn't a scam from you" the listener will think that he made the scam but I what I want to say is that I want proof from him and not that the scam is made by him.

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    If what the speaker meant was that he suspected it might be a scam perpetrated by the addressee, he'd could easily choose to explicitly clarify that by saying something like I want proof that it isn't a scam of yours. Since it would be likely he'd only have such suspicions in the first place if the addressee had a history of engaging in such activities, the most natural phrasing would probably be ...proof that it isn't another one of your scams. In any other contexts it would be at the very least "polite" to ignore that interpretation given OP's version. – FumbleFingers Aug 30 '18 at 13:58
  • @FumbleFingers I think you misunderstood my question. – BoSsYyY Aug 30 '18 at 17:56
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    I see nothing wrong with the sentence. It simply means: I want you to provide me with proof that it isn't a scam. There is no confusion over the subject. – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Aug 30 '18 at 20:33
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I want proof from you that it isn't a scam.

There is no misunderstanding. That sentence is fine.

if I say "I want proof that it isn't a scam from you" the listener will think that he made the scam

Agreed.

"from you" is modifying the preceding noun.

"proof (from you)" makes sense.

"scam (from you)" is somewhat ungrammatical. If it meant anything, it would likely be "scam (perpetrated by you)". Since that's not what you meant, then it shouldn't be composed that way.

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