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today, I wonder what is the correct sentence and I hope you can help me:

  1. This will be done until the end of this year.
  2. This will be done until by the end of this year.

Is sentence 1 or 2 right? Or are both possible?

Wishes

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  • 2
    Use either until or by, but note they have different meanings in this context. It's not idiomatically valid to include both. – FumbleFingers Aug 29 '18 at 16:51
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Done is an individual action or cessation of action, and until implies a period of time. So your first example would only be grammatically correct in the context of "My set of commemorative coins will be complete until the mint releases a new one next year." I cannot find a grammatically-correct use case for the second example.

Now, if you said, "This will be done by the end of this year.", you'd be giving yourself the period between now and the end of the year with which to complete a task. If you said, "This will be done at the end of this year.", you'd be implying that for whatever reason, you're waiting to do this task until around year-end. Likewise, if you said, "This will be worked on until the end of this year.", then you'd be implying that this task will take months of constant work to complete.

  • I don't think that's what "done" means here: In this context, "will be done" is the simple future passive of "to do". Sentence 1 could be rephrased as "[Someone] will do this until the end of the year." – 1006a Aug 29 '18 at 20:23
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I think that there's a slight ambiguity in the question.

  • This will be done until the end of this year.

If a company announces that on January 1 of 2019 they will change their name from Brand A to Brand B, and someone asks you how long the company will use the name Brand A, you might say "This will be done (someone will continue to do this) until the end of the year." The sense of "be done" here is progressive; a practice is done for a period of time.

  • This will be done by the end of this year.

At the moment, four months remain in 2018. If someone gives you an assignment today, and you wish to estimate that you need no more than those four months to complete the assignment, you might say "This will be done (this assignment will be complete) by the end of the year." The sense of "be done" here is not progressive; an assignment is completed at a certain moment.

  • This is a pretty good explaination, thank you very much. – Mike1993 Aug 30 '18 at 11:31

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