2

Take the below sentence for example:

Mike has as cute a cat as you do.

I wonder if it's a "cute a cat" or "a cute cat"?

1
  • Or you can say: "Mike's cat is as cute as your cat." Or "Your cat is as cute as Mike's cat". But I have a question: Is it correct to say "Your cat is as cute as Mike's."? – a.RR Aug 31 '18 at 15:27
5

It's always "as ADJECTIVE a[n] NOUN as"

As cute a cat as..
As big a job as..
As steep a hill as..
As fierce a dog as..
As wise an owl as..

...you've ever seen.

3
  • Or we can also say: "Mike's cat is as cute as your cat." Or "Your cat is as cute as Mike's cat." But I have a question: Is it correct to say "Your cat is as cute as Mike's."? – a.RR Aug 31 '18 at 15:31
  • 'Is it correct to say "Your cat is as cute as Mike's."?' - yes. – Michael Harvey Aug 31 '18 at 16:10
  • You can use "adverb+adjective" or even "verb" after "as" in the same way. "As loving a man as my father" or "As highly probable a chance as this" – SovereignSun Sep 2 '18 at 12:29
-2

It's not a question of "a cat" or "cat a". The sentence means that Mike has a cat and it's as cute as the one you have.

So, the correct phrasing would be

Mike has as a cute a cat as you do.

Edit: See Tetsujin's answer for more examples.

1
  • We don't place an article before the adjective in this case. – SovereignSun Sep 2 '18 at 12:30

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