1

We are able to combine two things when two things happen at the same time .Like in this example

She is in the kitchen and she is making coffee.

to

She is in the kitchen making coffee.

What about if the subjects are different ? . Is it still possible to reduce the sentence 1 to the sentence 2 without changing the meaning and is sentence 2 grammatically correct?

1- Julia was cooking dinner and her brother was reading a book .

to

2- Julia was cooking dinner her brother reading a book .

  • Julia in English is usually a female name, so it would be ... her brother reading a book. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 31 '18 at 19:45
  • My mistake sorry. – Talha Özden Aug 31 '18 at 19:46
1

Julia was cooking dinner her brother reading a book. is not grammatical and does not make sense in English.

To make it grammatical do one of the following:

Julia was cooking dinner, her brother reading a book.

Julia was cooking dinner, her brother was reading a book.

Julia was cooking dinner and her brother was reading a book.

Julia was cooking dinner while her brother was reading a book.

Julia was cooking dinner while her brother read a book.

0

All of your bolded sentences are grammatical.

This one:

Julia was cooking dinner her brother reading a book.

does not mean what you might think it means.

Normally when we wish to say that one action took place while another was ongoing, and without using the word while, it would be like this:

Her brother reading a book, Julia cooked dinner.

If the verb in both clauses is in the continuous, and there is no conjunction, the clauses are elliptical with the conjunction omitted and a form of BE omitted; we would typically punctuate with commas to reflect that underlying parallelism of the syntax and its omissions:

Julia was cooking dinner, her brother, reading a book.

which could be elaborated so:

Julia was cooking dinner (and) her brother (was) reading a book.

  • Thank you so what does this sentence actually mean "Julia was cooking dinner her brother reading a book." – Talha Özden Aug 31 '18 at 20:06
  • @Talha Özden : It means "Julia was cooking dinner and her brother was reading a book." – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 31 '18 at 20:10
  • I dont get it . So we can use the sentence 2 instead of the sentence 1 .Why do we use the punctuated version of the sentence 2 . This one " Julia was cooking dinner, her brother, reading a book" – Talha Özden Aug 31 '18 at 20:40
  • @Talha Özden : You asked about two things that "happen at the same time". The sentence Julia was cooking dinner and her brother was reading a book. does not present those two activities in any marked syntactic manner as coinciding, happening at the same time. You visited the Jones household on two separate occasions, the first time seeing Julia, the second time, her brother. What were they doing when you visited? The conjunction and does not imply a coinciding in the same way that a participle clause followed by a clause in the simple past does imply it. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 31 '18 at 21:16

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