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A lot of transitive and intransitive verbs out there but I want to know, Is there any rule? that can help us to determine it.

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    Hopefully you know the difference between transitive and intransitive verbs. Using these definitions, find the verb in the sentence. If the verb requires a direct object (i.e. the verb cannot be by itself/the action must be done to something else), then it is a transitive verb. For example, in the sentence Bob bought three apples, bought is transitive because it takes a direct object; you use money to buy something else (apples). For an intransitive verb, it may stand by itself, such as Jill dances. – Kman3 Sep 1 '18 at 2:17
  • Another good idea would be to use a dictionary if you struggle; it doesn't hurt. Speakers at every level require clarification from time to time. – Kman3 Sep 1 '18 at 2:19
  • Thank you. I can understand , though there are some ambiguities in mind. – Sobhani Sep 1 '18 at 3:13
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An excellent answer in the comments:

"Hopefully you know the difference between transitive and intransitive verbs. Using these definitions, find the verb in the sentence. If the verb requires a direct object (i.e. the verb cannot be by itself/the action must be done to something else), then it is a transitive verb. For example, in the sentence Bob bought three apples, bought is transitive because it takes a direct object; you use money to buy something else (apples). For an intransitive verb, it may stand by itself, such as Jill dances." – Kman3

"Another good idea would be to use a dictionary if you struggle; it doesn't hurt. Speakers at every level require clarification from time to time." – Kman3

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