1

I can’t understand and distinguish the necessity of using “will have to” instead of “have to”. I think both are giving the same meaning and both are giving an indefinite hint of future. For example,

  1. If you want to learn about your own treasure, You will have to give me one-tenth of your flock.
  2. If you want to learn about your own treasure, You have to give me one-tenth of your flock.
  3. You will have to do hard work.
  4. You have to do hard work.
  5. I have to do the math.
  6. I will have to do the math.

I want to know the difference among them.

Another thing is, “Have had to”

What is the meaning of “Have had to”? I want to know its meaning clearly so that it won't be able to puzzled me anymore. For example,

  1. I have had to learn other arts, such as the reading of palms.
  2. I have to learn other arts, such as the reading of palms.
1

The three forms that you have mentioned can be described as past, present and future. The past, have had to, is literally that- it describes an obligation that existed in the past, was fulfilled in the past and no longer exists:

I have had to learn other arts, such as the reading of palms

At some time in the past, an obligation existed to "learn other arts". Also in the past, the speaker did actually "learn other arts", and has completed it. The obligation no longer exists.

In English, we rarely use the present simple tense to describe what's happening now: we use it to describe something that's always true:

Water boils at 100 celsius
If you get a parking ticket, you have to pay a fine

Or a habit - for have to, this would be an ongoing requirement

He smokes
I have to spend two hours commuting every day

Or to talk about something that's planned or scheduled in the future:

I have to go to Sweden tomorrow

With have to, you can also use it to talk about a current commitment that must be honoured at some unspecified time in the future:

I have to do my homework before I can go out

And to explain the terms and conditions of something, for example the rules of a game:

If you land on a blue square, you have to miss a go.

The future tense is only used for things that will take place in the future:

If I take this job, I will have to spend two hours commuting every day.

Looking at your sentences: 1. (future) we are talking about something that will take place at some unspecified time in the future. 2. (present) is explaining terms and conditions. 3. (future) is talking about something that will happen in the future. 4. (present) could be talking about a general rule. 5. (present) could be a current obligation that must he honoured in the future. 6. (future) is something that must be done at some unspecified time in the future.

  • Could you please describe more about "have had to" ? – Sobhani Sep 2 '18 at 7:19
  • have had to is an obligation that existed in the past and was honoured in the past. The obligation no longer exists. – JavaLatte Sep 2 '18 at 9:26
  • And only "have had" ? – Sobhani Sep 2 '18 at 9:28
  • have/have had means to possess something. have to/have had to means to be obliged to do something. – JavaLatte Sep 2 '18 at 9:31
  • "I had to learn other arts, such as the reading of palms." It also means same as you are saying. "an obligation that existed in the past, was fulfilled in the past and no longer exists" – Sobhani Sep 2 '18 at 9:38

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