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The angry driver pulled alongside the cyclist, hands sweating at the wheel.

The angry driver pulled alongside the cyclist with his hands sweating at the wheel.

Can the first example stand as complete sentence without the joining 'with his'.

Do dependent clauses always require a subordinate conjunction or coordinating conjunction ? Can they just connect with a comma. Like I've done in the first example.

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The angry driver pulled alongside the cyclist, hands sweating at the wheel.

That sentence is fine. But nothing is being joined. "hands sweating at the wheel" is an adverbial phrase that described how he pulled alongside the cyclist.

He explained the point patiently, trying to make sense.

trying to make sense= an adverbial phrase that modifies how "he explained it."

conjunctions are for joining two independent clauses. Ones that stand on their own if you remove the conjunction. For example:

The angry driver pulled alongside the cyclist and his hands were swearing at the wheel.

  • Your last sentence has an unintentional (but marvellous) typo: "swearing at the wheel." – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Sep 3 '18 at 16:11
  • @JasonBassford What can I say? We aim to be humorous. Especially in these: bug- and snake-infested grasses. [not a great one, huh?] :) – Lambie Sep 3 '18 at 16:35
  • You are confusing dependent clauses and complex sentences and adverbial phrases. – Lambie Sep 4 '18 at 17:13

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