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Can we say "Learn something lightly?" The other day my brother told me to learn some stuff not thoroughly and it made me wonder about the actual adverb that comes with learn which gives this meaning. I found some words like "learn superficially" and "on the surface" (though I still can't figure out how to combine it with learn) but I was hoping to get some word that I could use in my daily conversations like "lightly". Saying "Learn this [whatever topic] superficially" to my friends seems kind of awkward.

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    Please use full words. Otherwise, it looks like text messaging. Also, you can use the marks ** before and after a word to make them bold rather than using all capital letters (all caps). Or alternatively, use quotation marks. ("like this"). – Lambie Sep 3 '18 at 14:57
  • Wow, didn't know about those marks... I will use them from now on then. I appreciate the correction. – Mirmuhsin Sodiqov Sep 3 '18 at 21:15
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It would not be idiomatic to use an adverb such as lightly after learn. While teachers may often instruct pupils to learn something properly or by heart it would sound most unusual to ask them just to learn it superficially.

Instead, if we want people to consider (rather than learn) a text, argument, proof, theorem or similar, we would use an expression such as:

Cast an eye over ....

Take a look at this ....

Glance through this ......

Read through the following.....

Consider the following case......

Bear the following in mind....

Give me your views on ......

Get the gist of the following....

All of these request people to give their attention to something rather than to learn it. You might suggest that someone should not study anything in (great) detail because the detail was not important but it would not be idiomatic to add slightly or lightly.

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