0

We need to improve the accuracy with which such errors are detected.

I usually use "accuracy" with a relative pronoun as shown above. After looking up dictionaries, I found that the sentence above can be rewritten as follows:

  1. We need to improve the accuracy in detecting such errors.
  2. We need to improve the accuracy of detection of such errors.

I am confused whether other prepositions such as "to" and "for" can be used, for example as follows:

  1. We need to improve the accuracy to detect such errors.
  2. We need to improve the accuracy for detection of such errors.

Which sounds most natural?

0

Accuracy refers to the degree of correctness or precision of some action or by extension of that which performs the action.

The rockets returned to their landing platform with great accuracy.

We can speak of accuracy as an abstraction, as a quality of actions or things that perform actions. But in actual contexts it does not exist apart from the action or the thing taking the action. So it is not idiomatic to say:

We need to improve the accuracy to detect such errors.

—not unless that sentence is understood to be elliptical:

We need to improve the accuracy [of our detecting device] to detect such errors.

So that if we were to say

In order to detect such errors, we need to improve the accuracy.

a reasonable question would be "The accuracy of what in particular?" if the thing that can be accurate in its action was not already known from context. But if it is known, the sentence is elliptical, as above.

0

Looks like it's results accuracy vs device accuracy for getting (in order to get) the wanted results.

1-2: Detecting errors with improved accuracy (a need in more accurate results).

3-4: Improving the method or device accuracy in order to make it possible to detect (= to find) small or some specific errors. The prepositions to/for agree here with the purpose of improving the accuracy.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.