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What is the meaning of "Or the other way around" in below sentence I sow in newspaper.

You read a book & tell someone you loved it & they go pick it up. Or the other way around.

Thank you.

  • 2
    If you "swap" you and "they", it will be the other way around, I reckon. But more context would help tell for sure. – Dr Sitecore Sep 4 '18 at 10:36
  • So can I say You read a book & tell someone you loved it & they go pick it up. Or vise versa. – r15 Sep 4 '18 at 10:44
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The phrase "the other way around" is synonymous with the originally Latin phrase vice versa, which means "the same is true if you reverse the order of the constituents" (making whatever changes are necessary to the grammatical case):

I like her and vice versa (that is, and she likes me).

I like her, and the other way around.

With your example:

You read a book & tell someone you loved it & they go pick it up.

The other way around:

Someone reads a book and tells you that they loved it, and you buy a copy of it.

0

The other way around would be:

Someone picks up a book that you have read, and you tell them that you loved it.

  • @James- Unfortunately I did not understand. – r15 Sep 4 '18 at 10:55
  • It is 'the other way around' because the order in which the events happened has changed. In the first case, (a) You read a book. (b) You told someone that you loved it. (c) They went out and bought it. In the sentence in my answer, (a) You read a book. (b) Someone buys a copy of the same book. (c) You tell them how much you loved the book that they just bought. The answer provided by Tᴚoɯɐuo shows a different way in which an 'other way around' can be applied to your sentence. For the record, I prefer Tᴚoɯɐuo's answer. – James Sep 5 '18 at 2:09

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