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Which one is correct?

I recommend him, have his teeth looked at by a dentist.
I recommend him, has his teeth looked at by a dentist.

First of all, something that confused me is that it appears that subjunctive verb grammar and causative have are intermingled here! If this is a subjunctive. As a subjunctive verb, I know we should use the base form of the verb. I doubt about the verb have. because we almost always have different rules about it. I also want to know if the negative sentence would be:

I recommend him, never have his teeth looked at by a dentist.

Thanks in advance

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I recommend (that) he have his teeth examined by a dentist.

This subjunctive complement for recommend is a clause, not an object as you have in your examples with him.

I recommend that he take Intro Biology.

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    Given that both of OP's (syntactically invalid) examples include him, it's worth noting I recommend him to have his teeth looked at by a dentist. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Sep 4 '18 at 16:04
  • I recommend him to have his teeth looked at by a dentist. is this a correct sentence? – a.toraby Sep 4 '18 at 16:07
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    @FumbleFingers: I don't understand your comment. What should be noted about that (invalid) sentence. That it, too, is invalid? – Tᴚoɯɐuo Sep 4 '18 at 16:35
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    @a.toraby: No, that is not correct. You advised him to have his teeth checked. recommend does not take a dual complement, the first an object, the second a clause. You can recommend him for the job. But you cannot recommend him that .... – Tᴚoɯɐuo Sep 4 '18 at 16:36
  • I mean that (despite some apparent disagreement in comments to another answer here) I have no problem with my him rephrasing above. And since (all three, as I now see, not just both) OP's examples feature him, it seems reasonable to show him a "syntactically valid" (according to my lights) version arrived at by minimal adjustment to his suggested constructions. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Sep 4 '18 at 16:42
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The verb recommend is used like this in your context:

  • I recommend [advise] he have his teeth looked at by a dentist.

  • I recommend [advise] he leave now.

Recommend is never followed by an indirect object pronoun except when it is used as an action verb: I recommended him for the job.

The same is true for the verb suggest:

  • I suggest you look up the list of verbs.
  • I suggest he look up the list of verbs.

Suggest and recommend are followed in the third person singular by the bare infinitive. I prefer not to call it subjunctive, and leave it at that for this purpose.

  • If I understand what you mean by Recommend is never followed by an indirect object pronoun except when it is used as an action verb, I disagree. There's nothing wrong with I recommend you to take [care, this medicine, my advice...]. And in case I'm mixing up direct/indirect objects there, I recommend this medicine to you. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Sep 4 '18 at 16:09
  • @FumbleFingers First, it's the subject version of you that's being used in your example, not the object version of you. (Unlike him and he they are spelled the same, so the issue isn't apparent.) But I would drop the preposition from your own sentence. Just I recommend you take. What this answer is saying is that you would not say I recommend him take (object pronoun) but I recommend he take (subject pronoun). – Jason Bassford Supports Monica Sep 4 '18 at 16:14
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    I recommend you take this medicine. This one: "I recommend you to take this medicine" is not kosher unless you are recommending that the you is being recommended to a third party. As in: I recommended John to take the medicine in the clinical trial, not Mary. You recommend John to the trial givers. The first is not an action verb, the second is and is in keeping with what I said. So, you have, in fact, made my point. – Lambie Sep 4 '18 at 16:15
  • Actually, **I'm recommending you to take this medicine, and not Mary." I'm recommending you for the job. – Lambie Sep 4 '18 at 16:19
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    I recommended him to take [whatever you like] is still an action verb. With an infinitive marker is still an action verb. So, what I said was correct. Mr. Chairman, I recommend him to take the post. But: I recommend you to [take] etc. is not direct address to a person. Direct address is: I recommend you take the medicine. – Lambie Sep 4 '18 at 16:38

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