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I faced the problem to find the proper word that could mean "for what you need to do" in this sentence:

Skint is BYOD system, that means you are supposed to bring your own laptop in order to use the Skint system for your exigencies.

This is the part of the corporative usage guide so I want it to sound as formal as possible, but I am afraid I could use some archaisms.

What do you think?

  • The word needs is the most likely choice there, or the phrase specific needs. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Sep 6 '18 at 17:47
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No, it doesn't sound very natural here. 'Exigencies' suggests compelling or unexpected needs, not just the need for a software system. You could say "for your needs" but it might be better to take it out entirely, given that most any system is used for its users' needs.

Also, in formal writing you should generally spell out acronyms the first time they're used. Also there's a missing article "a". Also, as written the sentence has an incorrect comma splice. Correcting these, you would have:

Skint is a bring-your-own-device (BYOD) system, which means that you are supposed to bring your own laptop in order to use Skint.

EDIT: I had also deleted the second "system". It's not ideal to repeat "system", but it might be necessary if (as commented) the word Skint is used for other things and could be ambiguous. Proper nouns like "Skint" generally don't take an article, but "system" does, so you can either "use Skint" or "use the system" or "use the Skint system":

Skint is a bring-your-own-device (BYOD) system, which means that you are supposed to bring your own laptop in order to use the system.

Skint is a bring-your-own-device (BYOD) system, which means that you are supposed to bring your own laptop in order to use the Skint system.

  • Thank you for such a full answer. Actually I had a qualm about the articles (as usual), so now I see that we don't need them in case some definite thing (like a specific system) is mentioned, right? – Gamilato Sep 7 '18 at 8:10
  • Also, there is the trouble of necessity of using the word "system", because that "Skint" is not only name of that system, but primarily it is the name of the conference hall, thus its multimedia system is called after it. So I thought in that case, I need to specify the phrase with the definite article. – Gamilato Sep 7 '18 at 9:03
  • @Gamilato That makes sense. I added a bit about that. – Paul Dexter Sep 8 '18 at 3:31
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Based on google, usage of "exigency" is getting lower, Probebly less than half since 1900, Maybe less natural now, So you can use its alternatives like:

In demand:

to ask for something forcefully, in a way that shows that you do not expect to be refused

Urgent:

needing attention very soon, especially before anything else, because important

Required:

necessary according to the rules or for a particular purpose

Requisite:

necessary or needed for a particular purpose

  • Thank you! But I believe the word "exigency" is a noun, and your variants are adjectives. – Gamilato Sep 7 '18 at 8:06

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