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It is from this article. Here is the context:

This one gets thrown around a lot by concerned moms and semi-tech-savvy grandpas. This is a fear-uncertainty-and-doubt kind of myth that stays alive not because of any sort of actual evidence, but because the urban-legend-tier consequences that are said to follow such supposedly unwise use of your smartphone.

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So the article is about many "myths" which are common wrong ideas that people think are true.

The author is making an exaggeration here of how wrong the ideas are, specifically the ideas about the consequences.

There isn't a real "scale of wrongness" that the author is talking about but it gives the reader an idea of one. Something like this (completely made up):

Levels of being a wrong idea - Urban-legend at the top

So an "urban-legend-tier" anything would probably be the highest level of being incorrect. That is the idea that the author is trying to get across.

I could replace the words like this:

This one gets thrown around a lot by concerned moms and semi-tech-savvy grandpas. This is a fear-uncertainty-and-doubt kind of myth that stays alive not because of any sort of actual evidence, but because the [incredibly incorrect but widely spread through rumor] consequences that are said to follow such supposedly unwise use of your smartphone.


What is an Urban Legend and why does it mean incorrectness here?

Merriam-Webster (Urban Legend):

a story about an unusual event or occurrence that many people believe is true but that is not true

Collins Dictionary (for Urban Legend see Urban Myth):

An urban myth is a strange or surprising story which many people believe, but which is not actually true.

Dictionary.com (Urban Legend):

a modern story of obscure origin and with little or no supporting evidence that spreads spontaneously in varying forms and often has elements of humor, moralizing, or horror:
Are there alligators living in the New York City sewer system, or is that just an urban legend?

So even though in this one context it looks like it ties in with consequences, most Urban Legends don't even deal with consequences. So using "urban-legend-tier" to describe something, refers to what all urban legends have in common = (1) they are wrong, incorrect, untrue; and (2) they are widespread and well known only through rumors and hearsay, not evidence.

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    I'd also add that your typical urban legend usually involves extreme and grisly consequences (as is the case in the article, which talks about batteries exploding and catching fire), so in this context urban-legend-tier consequences would not only mean unrealistic, but unrealistically severe as well. Sep 7, 2018 at 13:32
  • I'd go so far as to say that "severe" is the primary meaning here. Read the whole context. It doesn't make any sense to say that the myth stays alive because the consequences are unbelievable. Sep 7, 2018 at 15:38
  • I see what you mean in the context for it meaning extreme level of severity, rather than an extreme level of incorrectness (I never said "unbelievable" or "unrealistic"). However, in reading this list of Urban Legends I don't see any that focus on consequences. I'm happy to be corrected but Urban Legends are not "If you do this, these bad things will happen!", a couple might include consequences but really an Urban Legend simply states incorrect beliefs as facts: "Alligators do live in the sewers", "Chupacabras exist". Sep 7, 2018 at 16:12
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As a supplement to Jay's answer about the meaning ...

urban-legend (contemporary widespread false beliefs/apocrypha -- e.g. alligators living in the sewers of NYC)

and

tier (level)

combine to form a noun adjunct modifier of consequences.

Compare

Swiss-army-style knives

P.S. A very common collocation is dire consequences, so that urban-legend-tier can be understood as a stand-in for dire. When the term dire is used ironically or sarcastically, the implied meaning is "greatly exaggerated" or even "wholly unfounded".

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