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Can "under the Sun" (meaning "in this world") be replaced with "under the Moon", especially when it's about love between to young lovers, or will it be completely obscure in English?

For example,

"They wanted that that night would last forever, but nothing lasts forever under the Sun."

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    under the Sun is a fixed phrase, but even so, using it in this sentence has got a peculiar tinge since there is no Sun at night. Sep 8 '18 at 9:19
  • 'They wanted that that night would last forever' sounds quite odd. If you want to use the subjunctive you should use 'wished' rather than 'wanted', e.g. 'They wished that night would last forever'. Otherwise keep 'wanted' and drop the subjunctive, e.g. 'They wanted that night to last forever. Finally, drop 'under the sun'; it is completely unnecessary and adds nothing to this sentence. Oh! and replace the comma with a semi-colon. 'They wanted that night to last forever; but nothing last forever.'
    – James
    Sep 8 '18 at 17:14
  • Thanks, but those points are not focal in my question.
    – brilliant
    Sep 8 '18 at 17:34
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The standalone phrase

under the moon

isn't really used.

However, you might want to say

They wanted that the night would last forever, but nothing lasts forever under moonlight.
They wanted the night to last forever, but nothing lasts forever under moonlight.

It fulfills your conditions of implied night and romance.

If you wanted it to take place in late summer / early autumn

They wanted the night to last forever, but nothing lasts forever under a Harvest moon.

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