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As for the topic of proposal, what is the difference between

United Nations must bring forward a proposal to denuclearize South Korea to secure World peace.

and

United Nations must put forward a proposal to denuclearize South Korea to secure World peace.

When googling, the result didn't clearly state what I really needed, especially to compare them. There is another website, but I consider it as still vague.

bring forward a proposal

put forward a proposal

Although they MAY be the same, I THINK there may be subtle differences between them, and that's what I really needed as a foolproof.

  • What's the intended meaning you're trying to convey? Have you looked these vocabulary items in a dictionary? If so, edit what you've found into your post and explain what makes your doubts persist. Remember, Google isn't the final arbiter of English usage. – userr2684291 Sep 10 '18 at 2:59
  • When you say googling, does it already include online dictionaries? – John Arvin Sep 10 '18 at 15:12
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+50

Not sure where to find a source on this, but here is my opinion as a native speaker:

Bring forward, put forward, suggest, offer, and propose are definitely synonyms.

First, I find one subtle difference between them is the amount of confidence the speaker/writer has in what is being offered.

Just between the two, put forward shows more confidence than bring forward.

(strongest) I will push forward with the proposal at the next meeting.

(strong) I will put forward the proposal at the next meeting.

(weaker) I will bring forward the proposal at the next meeting.

(weakest) I will [suggest / offer] the proposal at the next meeting.

So when I read your example sentences, the one that uses "bring forward" makes me think that the proposal is more open for discussion and not yet complete. But the one that uses "put forward" makes me think that it has already been considered thoroughly and less discussion or opposition is expected.


Another subtle difference is whether the proposal still needs to be made or not. When I read your example sentence:

United Nations must [bring forward / put forward] a proposal to denuclearize South Korea to secure World peace.

"bring forward" carries a hint that the proposal still needs to be made.
"put forward" carries a hint that the proposal is already made.

  • I see. Your a native speaker from where? – John Arvin Sep 15 '18 at 18:43
  • 1
    American, Northeast. – Jay A. Little Sep 16 '18 at 2:59
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Both bring forward a proposal and put forward a proposal mean making a proposal. Which phrasal verb to use is just a matter of preference:

An array of proposals put forward last week by the Trump administration to reorganize and reform federal agencies would have major impacts on their workforces. (source)

British Prime Minister Theresa May urged Donald Trump to bring forward proposals on achieving peace in the Middle East after the U.S. president recognised Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. (source)

1

Both are acceptable and mean the same thing, but in the United Nations the phrase "put forward a proposal" is used much more often currently.

If you search within the United Nations site http://www.un.org/en/index.html , then there are 173 instances of "put forward a proposal" versus only 3 "bring forward a proposal".

For example the Model United Nations page The Process of Negotiation says:

You can put the proposal yourself (alone or in association with other delegations)
You can encourage another delegation to put forward a proposal responsive to your wishes
You can persuade another delegation to revise its proposal, to make it more accommodating of your wishes
You can merge your proposal with the proposal of another delegation
You can persuade the conference to amend a proposal put forward by another delegation, again to bring it more into line with your wishes
Often you will find that another delegation has done one of the above, in which case you can support them or just let them do the work.

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