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We often use (opinion + fact) adjective for example : "an interesting young man" , "a nice long table" etc.

And also we use (adverb+adjective) for example : "a reasonably cheap restaurant" , "an extremely good game" etc.

As far as I know we don't use (opinion + opinion) adjective instead of (adverb+opinion adjective)

I mean we don't use "a reasonable cheap restaurant" instead of "a reasonably cheap restaurant"

Is there any rule about this context I don't know ? or Is it just a more idiomatic way to use?

  • I don't think there's any rule about that. You can certainly say "a beautiful, tasteful dress", which is two opinions in a row. In your examples, reasonably and extremely just happen to modify the opinion-adjectives that fall after them, but there's no rule that says they have to modify opinions and not facts. – stangdon Sep 16 '18 at 13:03
  • You can use "a reasonable cheap restaurant" but it does not mean the same thing. It means the restaurant is cheap and [the food] is reasonable. – Weather Vane Sep 16 '18 at 13:34
  • We can use 'opinion and opinion', e.g. 'He is an interesting and reasonable young man.' – James Sep 16 '18 at 14:23
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(opinion[A] + opinion[B]) adjective[C]

Adjectives modify nouns. A is an adjective, B is an adjective, and C is a noun.

This means C is A and B.

interesting young man = The man is young and interesting

(adverb[A] + opinion[B] adjective[C])

Adverbs modify verbs or adjectives.

C is B. A provides more information about B.

So the adverb is modifying the adjective, and the modified adjective is then modifying the noun.

a reasonably cheap restaurant

"Reasonably restaurant" isn't something you can take away from this sentence. It's a cheap restuarant. How cheap? Reasonably cheap.

Now - you can say reasonable restaurant to mean a restaurant that is reasonable in some way, and one of those ways can be price. Context has to support this.

  • Heh heh. Maybe it's a restaurant that is willing to listen to a cogent presentation of the facts and logic and admit when it's wrong. <big wide grin> – puppetsock Sep 17 '18 at 4:03

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