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I took a fall and injured myself. Can the phrase ever be used to describe literal falls?

I know it has a meaning in boxing, but what I'm asking is if you fell and..let's say you broke your knee, could you later say "I took a fall and broke my knee", instead of "I fell and broke my knee"?

  • Can you check, did you mean "and" instead of "an". What do you suppose the figurative meaning to be? I know "take a fall" has a meaning in boxing, is this what you are talking about? – James K Sep 18 '18 at 18:23
  • I know, i looked it up. But, what i'm asking is, if you fell on and..let's say you broke your knee, could you later say "I took a fall and broke my knee", instead of "i fell and broke my knee"? @JamesK – Soumya Ghosh Sep 18 '18 at 18:28
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It is sometimes used literally, for example:

Kesha took a fall on stage at a show (source)

When I took a fall and broke my arm, Michelle called me at home to see how I was recovering.

I believe this use is more common in America.

But you should be aware that the idioms suggest doing something on purpose, either losing a boxing match on purpose, or being the scapegoat (to protect someone else)

  • Right. I suppose that could be discerned from the context, whether we're talking about someone doing something to save someone, or that boxing match thing. Thank you for the help. :) – Soumya Ghosh Sep 18 '18 at 18:50

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