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What does "I cannot be more thankful" mean?

I want to say that I am very thankful for having this opportunity. Can I say something like the following?

... and I cannot be more thankful for having this opportunity.

Thank you

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  • The immediate meaning is as the words imply, but the connotation depends on the context. Please supply the context. – Lawrence Sep 18 '18 at 21:21
  • I want to say that I am very thankful for having this opportunity. Can I say something like "And I cannot be more thankful for having this opportunity"? – personal learner Sep 18 '18 at 21:22
  • It's grammatically correct, but it would be more idiomatic to say "...I could not be more thankful." – stangdon Sep 18 '18 at 21:56
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The phrase in the title conveys what it says: an inability to rustle up more thanks. However, the connotation depends on context: words, smile/frown, situation, etc.

It could mean that the little appreciation you’ve expressed is all you can summon, or that you’re so filled with gratitude that you feel like you’d float if you were any more thankful.

In your context, you are expressing sincere gratitude with the phrase, especially if the rest of what you communicate says likewise.

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