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It has appeared that, if we take any common object of the sort that is supposed to be known by the senses, what the senses immediately tell us is not the truth about the object as it is apart from us, but only the truth about certain sense-data which, so far as we can see, depend upon the relations between us and the object.

(Problems of Philosophy , Bertrand Russell, Chapter I)

What is the meaning of the word "as" in this context? Does it mean "because"?

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In your example

the object as it is apart from us

the complete phrase you are wondering about is

as it is

which has the meaning

the way it is

so

the object the way it is apart from us

The point of the passage is that our senses only know what they sense about something and not necessarily the absoluteness about that thing.

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I think 'because' or 'since' is the closest meaning in this context. Rewording slightly:

What the senses immediately tell us is not the truth about the object, because the object is apart from us. Instead, the senses only tell us the truth about certain sense-data.

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