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Salary is paid on a monthly basis.

I created the sentence above. It is assumed here that a year is divided into several periods. For example, each period has three months, and salary is sometimes paid every three months. In this case, can I say as follows?:

Salary is generally paid on a monthly basis, but sometimes on the/that period basis.

I am afraid whether this is correct because I couldn't find this usage. I want to use a period the length of which is defined myself.

This example may be not good. I merely want to know whether it is possible to use the form of "on the ... basis".

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There's no requirement to use the merely because you're switching from a "standard" basis like weekly or monthly or quarterly to an idiosyncratic one:

Salary is generally paid on a monthly basis, but sometimes on another basis that takes special circumstances into account.

If you have given a name to that special basis earlier in the document, let's say you had called it the "Rama" basis, you could use either article:

Salary is generally paid on a monthly basis, but sometimes on a|the Rama basis.

It is difficult to answer such questions in the abstract. It really depends on how you refer to this custom or idiosyncratic basis in your text.

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You will want to stick with a ____ly basis. Using the in this context is rare and thus reserved for contexts that are specialized or have been used since the 1950s.

So, you will want to say/write

Salary is generally paid on a monthly basis, but sometimes on a quarterly basis.

Note that quarterly is the time period that amounts to every three months, or four times a year.

Depending on which corpora of English one searches, there is either no or an extremely (actually, abysmally) low number of uses of the before a string such as daily/weekly/monthly/quarterly/yearly basis.

Even Google Ngrams gives this result.

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  • I want to use a period the length of which is defined myself. – rama9 Sep 19 '18 at 19:13

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